"Not only is the universe stranger than what we imagine,
it is stranger than what we can imagine."
Sir Arthur Eddington

The way of the Main Sail

The authorities were waiting with a dozen forms to be filled out, many in triplicate or more. They are however, very accommodating as they supply the carbon paper. To our younger reads, please google “carbon paper” and learn what preceded copy machines and paperless transactions. With a strong British tradition, all forms must be completely filled out, errors corrected with single line and initialed. By now I almost memorized our passport numbers, gross and net tonnage and the odd way Europeans write dates. With the official Trinidad clearances in hand from Chaguaramas Customs, we make Kalunamoo ready for sea: all movable objects safely stowed as ocean sailing begets unpredictable projectile trajectories of unsecured said objects.

On Chacachacare, Venezuela in the distance.
On Chacachacare, Venezuela in the distance.

We set sail through the Dragon Mouths by way of the Monos Island passage. Mainsail was hoisted by Scotland Bay, the sheltered deep water cove off to starboard. A few cruising boats sat in the still waters, probably waiting the run out of Trinidad. Off to port was Huevos and Chacachacare, the former leper colony (closed in the 1970’s). That island is now a part of all the park land around this western tip of Trinidad. A few days ago, we visited Chacachacare with a group of cruisers and had a good beach BBQ celebrating a friend’s birthday. It is all undeveloped and heavily overgrown, a true deserted island. Beyond that is the Peninsula de Paria, Venezuela.
We bid farewell to Trinidad, the summer home of Kalunamoo.

Abandoned doctor's home on Chacachacare
Abandoned doctor's home on Chacachacare

A new season began as we sailed to the island chain to the north. With building easterly trades, we sailed with only jib, stay sail and full main. The wind was too hard on the bow for the mizzen and it would not be needed with the building trades.

No other cruisers were seen heading north and we saw only two Venezuelan fishing boats who waved at us as we sailed by. They will probably sell their catch in Trinidad and buy goods for their people back home before returning to Venezuela. By sunset we passed between the oil production platforms Hibiscus and Poinsettia. A work boat seemingly laying cable made us alter course, although the AIS reported they were anchored. They seemed to be moving fairly well for being anchored! It reminded me of the news, just recently received, of an Australian couple we got to know in Trinidad, that lost their boat off the coast of New Jersey due to a collision with a fishing trawler. After sailing around the world without incident, they lost out to a New Jersey driver! In any case, collisions at sea can ruin your whole day.

We laid out a course north to Carriacou hoping not to set too far west. By 0200 we made the south east coast of the spice island, Grenada. The wind was 20 knots just north of east, but the mountains of Grenada backed it more to the east-north-east. It was going to a be motor sail slog up the east coast of Grenada if we were to make Carriacou after dawn. I counted on the South Equatorial Current to give us a boost after we passed Grand Bacolet Point half way up the coast. Eventually it did but sailing close to a lee shore at night kept me up most of the night. By dawn we were half way between Grenada and Carriacou, the southern limit of the Grenadines. The winds veered to the east and we sailed easily, if bouncy, to Tyrrel Bay, dropping the hook at 0830.

Tyrrel Bay
Tyrrel Bay

Home of the Carriacou sloops
Home of the Carriacou sloops

Early morning noodling in Tyrrel Bay
Early morning noodling in Tyrrel Bay

We are always a little apprehensive on the first passage after a long absence. Kalunamoo was on the hard since mid-June and we all needed to regain our sea legs. Also, a one-day overnight sail is hard because you don’t get into a sea routine and end up awake for 30 hours. After clearing Customs and Immigration in Carriacou (one form, although more expensive than Trinidad), I was ready for a good nap! A refreshing swim in the clear water, an outdoor fresh water rinse off, a shot or two of “arrival rum”, a good meal Maureen prepared, and an evening under the bright stars completed our return to the cruisers life…the way of the Main Sail.                                            

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Comments

sepertinya Trinidad tempat yang menarik untuk dikunjungi. Saya penasaran dan ingin liburan ke trinidad.terimakasih infonya.

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 tuwono  11/22/2018

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Good sailing B and M, better make that M and B to avoid misunderstanding. Happy to know you are safe and all is well.

 George and Penny  11/2/2018

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