"Not only is the universe stranger than what we imagine,
it is stranger than what we can imagine."
Sir Arthur Eddington

Sailing South


Entering Port Elizabeth
Entering Port Elizabeth


Our daughter Melanie and son-in-law Dave flew down to Martinique to stay on board for a week while we explored Martinique. That was the plan. Things change as Maureen had to fly to New York for medical issues and we had to have a new generator installed in St Lucia. Instead of a week on one island the plan changed to a five-day jaunt down the Grenadines starting in St. Lucia.

As all cruisers know sailing between islands is always more pleasant when the right "weather window" opens. Although the distance between islands is not great, in fact that is what makes this area so popular, you are in the open ocean with strong Trade Winds. A "day sail" usually turns into an open ocean passage even if it is only for a day. Since schedules are the bane of cruisers, tell us where to be or when to be somewhere but don't combine them! When visitors are aboard with a fix schedule, only God can tell what will happen and when!

God looked favorably down on the three of us for the week we sailed south. The Trade Winds were brisk to strong but the seas were moderate. Not the most ideal conditions but what was in our favor was that the winds were north of east and squalls were few. That gave us a beam reached all the way to Grenada. It turned out to be the best sailing we had in some time.



Melanie and Dave drove from their home in Rochester to Montreal, fly to Martinique, and then fly to St. Lucia. They made it to Kalunamoo by 7PM Sunday, we checked out, and sailed 4AM Monday morning to Bequia. After a great sail to Bequia we were greeted by Kenmore who took great photos of Kalunamoo under sail entering Port Elizabeth Harbor. A good souvenir for Melanie! The next day was an off day and we snorkeled the Devil's Table, Princess Margaret Beach, bought lobsters for dinner and sampled the new floating bar in the harbor.

Bequia Lobsters
Bequia Lobsters


The sail to Carriacou the next day was an even better as the winds were not as strong, upper teens to low 20's and seas flatter. Anchored in Tyrell Bay we checked in and had dinner aboard. The next day we shifted over to Sandy Island for some good snorkeling. Sandy Island is what you find in the Bahamas a small sand spit with good snorkeling.

Sandy Island
Sandy Island


The last and third sail on Friday took us down the west coast of Grenada to Prickly Bay. It is not often you sail on the west coats of the islands as the constant east winds bring you along a lee shore with nowhere to run if any problems arise. But all was well and by going down the east side you avoid the usual dead wind shadow and the strong head winds on the south end of the island. Prickly Bay and most of the anchorages are on the south coast of Grenada.

The week flew by and they enjoyed great sailing, good snorkeling and food. I introduced other cruiser friends along the way and demonstrated our live-aboard cruising life style. The best part, however, was spending time with our oldest daughter and her husband, even if she did win Mexican Train Dominoes!

Maureen is feeling much better and is eager to get back on board. She reports that it is cold up north! Of course, we miss being together even if 24/7 is sometimes a challenge! I think it is a challenge we both embrace. Maureen flies back here in a few days and we will both fly back to New York for our grandson's college graduation and a family wedding. Life moves on and we try to take one day at a time taking advantage of the time we have. That time is limited as sad news knowns no season. This post is dedicated to Ann, our son-in-law Drew's mother who passed yesterday.

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