"Not only is the universe stranger than what we imagine,
it is stranger than what we can imagine."
Sir Arthur Eddington

Right Parts, Good Friends, Wet Weather

 


The right freshwater circulating pump arrived a week after it was shipped from Belgium. The typical “two week” island job actually took four weeks, which is really quick. The parts were shipped from Belgium to Memphis TN to San Juan and then Antigua, cleared customs, delivered locally and installed. And the best part is that the engine works. Sometimes, all you need is a little faith.

 

The quick shipment demonstrated how much of the world is instantly connected. Of course, there are still many areas that are not, but those areas are less each year. Even fewer areas lack cell phone coverage and virtually any place can be contacted with sat phones. The advent of thousands of communication satellites displacing star constellations has begun. Imagine for the first time in history, mankind will look to the night sky and see, not the familiar star formations, but a constant swam of star like objects circulating overhead. It will enable anyone to instantly “facetime” anyone anywhere. Will world-wide drone shipments follow? Will direct fruit shipments from a farmer’s South American field to your table in Alaska be possible after you view his fruit trees and told him which fruit to pick for you? Free delivery world-wide!

Our month stay in Falmouth Harbor is over. There were still some Salty Dawgs around from their rally south but for us, we were ready to up anchor. The only problem is that the anchor chain accumulates an amazing amount of growth on it after a month. The 20 feet or so that hangs from the bow to the bottom looks like a thick hawser when lifting the anchor. Scrubbing it while raising the anchor does not get it all off and it quickly starts to smell while coiled in the chain anchor. When we sailed to Deep Bay, I had to put most of the chain in a bucket of bleach water to get it clean. Well, that’s what you get for staying at anchor for a month: roots!

 

Oassis, Moya Mareeah, Casa Tu, Roxie
Oassis, Moya Mareeah, Casa Tu, Roxie

 

 

Fire Starter & Grll Master
Fire Starter & Grll Master

In Deep Bay, a small anchorage in Antigua, four other cruiser friends joined us for a few days. We had a good beach B-B-Q, a night of Farkel and good stories to share. Fortunately, there was a canvas tent set up on the beach which seemed to be semi-permanent and unused. It came in handy as we had our beach BBQ there but this week the “rainy season” was in season. Hourly deluges interrupted by hot sunny weather prevailed. The good news is that our “water maker”, the rain catchment system, was overflowing with the abundant rain. We still have fresh water that we took on in Trinidad and the rainwater extends our supply for showers and washdowns.

 

Filler' up!
Filler' up!

The last month has been a little unusual as far as the weather. Of course, living on a boat we become one with the weather. For a number of days  light westerly winds prevailed. That was because of a tropical storm that sat north of here. Our cruiser friends on Moya Mreeya took advantage of that and sailed from St. Thomas to Antigua in following winds – very unusual!  Since then it’s been very squally. Not constant rain, just 15 minute down pours.

The winter months are the driest months so squalls should become less frequent and the routine of the hourly command to “batten down the hatches” should cease! It does seem, however, that the “rainy season” has been extended over the last few years. Even the ending of our hurricane season coverage was moved back to mid-November by our insurance company as a reflection of this. Hurricanes are an artifact of the “rainy season”, so there must be something to it.

 

Batten the Hatches!
Batten the Hatches!

 

Rainbows are always nice to see. This one, over Mark and Lynn’s ketch Roxy was almost a daily early morning occurrence.








 


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